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  • Carriage House Lavender

DIY Lavender Wreath Making

Updated: Jul 11


DIY wreath in process, with Opal Rain and Riverina Thomas lavender from Oregon lavender farm
Photo of a partially-made wreath, with Opal Rain and Riverina Thomas lavender from our farm

Lavender wreaths are a tasteful and aromatic addition to anyone’s front door or home. We may be most familiar with Christmas wreaths, but they can be enjoyed year-round! Learn how to create your own DIY lavender wreath, with easy, step by step directions. Don’t be intimidated by the dried lavender wreath Martha Stewart would make! Our wreath tutorial should be easy to follow. We want to inspire your inner artist! Anyone can make a beautiful flower wreath.

If you’re looking for instructions on how to plant and care for lavender plants. stay tuned to this blog to learn the farmers’ recommendation to lavender care.

However, pruning your lavender plants is an important part to lavender care, and will help produce the most beautiful, tall blooms! Regular pruning also prevents a lavender plant from becoming “woody,” an aesthetic choice many people wish to avoid.

Maybe you’ve just pruned, and have piles of lavender lying around! Perfect! Make a wreath!

Materials image used in how to make your own lavender wreath
Materials needed for this project: floral wire, scissors to trim, and plenty of lavender

Materials:

  • Wreath form

  • Whether it is a wire wreath form, a grapevine wreath start, or mesh wreath is up to you! Choose what calls to you. At our in-person lavender wreath making classes, we begin with a grapevine wreath.

  • Lavender

  • Whatever you have available is great! We use Australian and English lavender.

  • Floral wire (or twine, but floral wire is easier to work with for a lasting shape)

  • Scissors to trim lavender

Picture of Opal Rain lavender bunch being trimmed, for our DIY lavender wreath
Step 1: Trim your lavender (Pictured: Opal Rain)

Process

  1. Trim your lavender pieces. We will be grouping lavender sprigs together; cut the lavender to make a roughly uniform sprig length. We prefer to have shorter stems, 5" to 6" generally.

  2. Group your lavender sprigs together to form lavender bunches.